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Conifers and Relatives

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(14 total)

Metasequoia and Sequoia
Metasequoia and Sequoia
© 1998 Dr. Richard Paselk, Humboldt State University Natural History Museum

Metasequoia occidentalis
Metasequoia occidentalis
© 2002 Audrey Aronowsky, University of California Museum of Paleontology

Pinus radiata
Pinus radiata
© 2004 UCMP

What are Conifers and Relatives? Conifers are seed-bearing plants whose reproductive structures are grouped together in cones. While most are evergreen (they keep their leaves year-round), some drop their leaves once a year. And while most have thin, needle- or scale-like leaves, some conifers have wide leaves. Their extinct relatives, the Cordaitales, share some but not all characters with conifers. The first record of conifers comes from the Carboniferous, and many species survive today, including the oldest living organisms, the bristlecone pines, and the tallest ones, the giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron).

First known fossil occurrence: Carboniferous.

Last known fossil occurrence: Quaternary. This group has living relatives.

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See Conifers and Relatives from the:

Quaternary
Tertiary
Cretaceous
Jurassic
Triassic
Permian
Carboniferous
Devonian
Silurian
Ordovician
Cambrian
Precambrian
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